FILTERING OUT THE BLUES: AVOIDING BLUE LIGHT AT NIGHT FOR BETTER SLEEP


Man’s eyes feeling strained working in front of computer screen
BLUE LIGHT AT NIGHT AFFECTS SLEEP

There is a proverb that says that the eyes are the window to the soul, but the eyes are likewise the gateway to our sleep.


Studies show that getting limited hours of sleep is linked to a plethora of health problems, including diabetes and cardiovascular issues. Inadequate sleep has also been found to correlate with an increased risk of depression. Studies have also found that short sleep is linked to blue light exposure after dusk.


Blue and green light (the shorter end of the light spectrum) is good for people during the day because it helps keep people alert and enthused and improves the secretion of our hormones. However, the same light can be detrimental at the end of the day. Blue light affects the secretion of melatonin significantly more than any other kind of light. Exposure to blue light can suppress melatonin secretion for as long as three hours for 6.5 hours of exposure, compared to 1.5 hours suppression of the same length of exposure to green light. Insufficient melatonin makes it difficult for one to fall asleep. While there are supplements available, the studies on the oral intake of melatonin are conflicting at best.